Passionate Aprilia Owners #DownUnder, launch the #ApriliaOwnersClubofAustralia!

#Motorraddicts tips their hats to the group of Aussies that decided to put the Aprilia Owners Club of Australia on the map! The club was officially launched earlier this year at the #LaverdaConcourse in #Queensland Australia, and it’s been a smash hit amongst Ape owners everywhere!

They took it from an idea to a reality in a very short amount of time, while securing permission from the #Aprilia italy and #Piaggio, and have built up a pretty decent amount of corporate sponsors. The membership is growing fast and we love how things are starting to look! They have plans for #rides #techSessions #TrackDays #TrackCoaching #Travel #Races and a lot more. The merchandise is looking great and membership perks so far are amazing!

AND….It turns out, its one of the very few larger Aprilia Owners Clubs in the world!

#kudos guys! Amazing! We Love your Passion! ūüôā

If you own an Aprilia and live in Australia, We suggest you check AOCA out! and join up!

website : www.apriliaowners.club
official FB Page: https://www.facebook.com/apriliaownersclubaustralia/
FB Social Page : https://www.facebook.com/groups/ApriliaOwnersClubAustralia/

2018 Portimao World Supersport Superpole Results: Cresson Misses Session

Motorraddicts Brings you another sneak peak into MotoMatters.com. Want more awesome motorcycle news? Subscribe to them and offer some financial support!

World #Supersport #Superpole one had eighteen riders competing for two places, including Hector Barbara on Kenan #Sofuoglu’s old bike but Loris #Cresson was ruled unfit after an earlier crash.

Heading into the mid-session break of the first session, Hikari Okubo and Raffaele Dr Rosa were in the top spots and after the break, De Rosa took the top spot on the #MVAgusta, with Hector Barbera third quickest and trying for second place as the flags came out. De Rosa increased his lead at the top with a 1’45.938, and Okubo’s 1’46.272 was enough to hold off Barbera’s charge. Borja Quero Martinez and Thomas Gradinger rounded out the fifth row behind Barbera.

Superpole two had six Yamahas in the top six places with a seventh in tenth place. After a lap, Federico Caricasulo set a 1’45.299, with Lucas Mahias and Randy Krummenacher joining him in the 1’45s while Sandro Cortese was a second off Caricasulo’s top lap. A lap later, Jules Cluzel top the top spot only to be deposed by his countryman Lucas Mahias who set a 1’45.170 before everyone popped back to the pits for a break.

Randy Krummenacher was first out, almost a lap clear of everyone else. putting himself into fifth place as the field joined him on track. Federico Caricasulo was the first rider into the 1’44s with a 1’44.813 putting him at the top with over two minutes left. With twenty seconds left, Lucas Mahias moved the goalposts to 1’44.588, just missing the lap record, with nobody on track close to challenging him for pole position.

Lucas Mahias took pole position ahead of Federico Caricasulo and Sandro Cortese, with Jules Cluzel heading the second row with Raffaele De Rosa and Randy Krummenacher.

Qualifying Results:

Pos No. Rider Bike Time Gap Speed
1 144 L. MAHIAS Yamaha YZF R6 1’44.588 271,6
2 64 F. CARICASULO Yamaha YZF R6 1’44.813 0.225 270,9
3 11 S. CORTESE Yamaha YZF R6 1’44.899 0.311 274,3
4 16 J. CLUZEL Yamaha YZF R6 1’45.094 0.506 278,6
5 3 R. DE ROSA MV Agusta F3 675 1’45.295 0.707 267,6
6 21 R. KRUMMENACHER Yamaha YZF R6 1’45.578 0.990 269,6
7 111 K. SMITH Honda CBR600RR 1’45.884 1.296 270,9
8 86 A. BADOVINI MV Agusta F3 675 1’46.068 1.480 267,6
9 78 H. OKUBO Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’46.311 1.723 268,9
10 38 H. SOOMER Honda CBR600RR 1’46.418 1.830 266,9
11 6 C. PEROLARI Yamaha YZF R6 1’46.540 1.952 266,2
12 81 L. STAPLEFORD Yamaha YZF R6 1’48.084 3.496 264,3
13 98 H. BARBERA Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’46.588 0.650 275,0
14 39 B. QUERO MARTINEZ Yamaha YZF R6 1’46.729 0.791 262,4
15 36 T. GRADINGER Yamaha YZF R6 1’47.185 1.247 277,1
16 74 J. VAN SIKKELERUS Honda CBR600RR 1’47.397 1.459 265,6
17 56 P. SEBESTYEN Honda CBR600RR 1’47.408 1.470 269,6
18 77 W. TESSELS Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’47.435 1.497 269,6
19 47 R. HARTOG Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’47.712 1.774 270,2
20 49 S. HORNSEY Triumph Daytona 675 1’47.885 1.947 263,6
21 15 A. COPPOLA Yamaha YZF R6 1’47.987 2.049 270,2
22 70 M. PONS Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.149 2.211 266,9
23 10 N. CALERO Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.215 2.277 266,2
24 88 C. STANGE Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.499 2.561 268,9
25 34 J. ITURRIOZ Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.651 2.713 264,3
26 50 K. NAGAO Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.710 2.772 265,6
27 75 I. LOPES Yamaha YZF R6 1’49.444 3.506 260,5
28 12 A. MURLEY Honda CBR600RR 1’51.529 5.591 255,6

Superpole One Results:

Pos No. Rider Bike Time Gap Speed
1 3 R. DE ROSA MV Agusta F3 675 1’45.938 266,9
2 78 H. OKUBO Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’46.272 0.334 274,3
3 98 H. BARBERA Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’46.588 0.650 275,0
4 39 B. QUERO MARTINEZ Yamaha YZF R6 1’46.729 0.791 262,4
5 36 T. GRADINGER Yamaha YZF R6 1’47.185 1.247 277,1
6 74 J. VAN SIKKELERUS Honda CBR600RR 1’47.397 1.459 265,6
7 56 P. SEBESTYEN Honda CBR600RR 1’47.408 1.470 269,6
8 77 W. TESSELS Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’47.435 1.497 269,6
9 47 R. HARTOG Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’47.712 1.774 270,2
10 49 S. HORNSEY Triumph Daytona 675 1’47.885 1.947 263,6
11 15 A. COPPOLA Yamaha YZF R6 1’47.987 2.049 270,2
12 70 M. PONS Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.149 2.211 266,9
13 10 N. CALERO Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.215 2.277 266,2
14 88 C. STANGE Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.499 2.561 268,9
15 34 J. ITURRIOZ Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.651 2.713 264,3
16 50 K. NAGAO Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’48.710 2.772 265,6
17 75 I. LOPES Yamaha YZF R6 1’49.444 3.506 260,5
18 12 A. MURLEY Honda CBR600RR 1’51.529 5.591 255,6

Superpole Two Results:

Pos No. Rider Bike Time Gap Speed
1 144 L. MAHIAS Yamaha YZF R6 1’44.588 271,6
2 64 F. CARICASULO Yamaha YZF R6 1’44.813 0.225 270,9
3 11 S. CORTESE Yamaha YZF R6 1’44.899 0.311 274,3
4 16 J. CLUZEL Yamaha YZF R6 1’45.094 0.506 278,6
5 3 R. DE ROSA MV Agusta F3 675 1’45.295 0.707 267,6
6 21 R. KRUMMENACHER Yamaha YZF R6 1’45.578 0.990 269,6
7 111 K. SMITH Honda CBR600RR 1’45.884 1.296 270,9
8 86 A. BADOVINI MV Agusta F3 675 1’46.068 1.480 267,6
9 78 H. OKUBO Kawasaki ZX-6R 1’46.311 1.723 268,9
10 38 H. SOOMER Honda CBR600RR 1’46.418 1.830 266,9
11 6 C. PEROLARI Yamaha YZF R6 1’46.540 1.952 266,2
12 81 L. STAPLEFORD Yamaha YZF R6 1’48.084 3.496 264,3

#Brembo #PR16 Master Cylinder #Brake #Recall Update

#BREMBO MC RECALL UPDATE 
Brembo PR16

Hello, Fellow Addicts!

As promised, we’ve been keeping an eye on developments related to the #Brembo Master Cylinder #recall

As we mentioned earlier in the week, the reported fault seems to indicate that under heavy braking pressure, such as heavy braking during mountain carving, or track days, the plastic internal piston Brembo decided to use in the PR16 Model, may crack.  The PR16 MC is usually mated with the M50 Caliper.

Brembo has admitted that they used a ‘polyphenylene sulphide’ plastic piston and for now they are agreeing to replace the US recalled units with an aluminium version. ¬†There is no word from Brembo on recalls in other countries.

As mentioned in our last post on the issue, should the piston crack, front brake pressure will be lost and brake fluid can also leak out of the unit and spill onto the bike.  We all know what brake fluid can do to a nice paint scheme!

Here is a crude schematic of a motorcycle master cylinder.  They vary in design slightly from one bike to another, however this should give you an idea of what this piston (circled in red) looks like.

Those of you watching know that so far the recall is only in the US.    However, due to the potential danger, affected owners in the UK, Canada and Australia are understandably worried.

Some other media outlets have speculated that perhaps Brembo only used the plastic piston in the PR16 MC’s destined for the US market and sent aluminium piston equipped PR16 units out to the rest of the world. ¬† ¬†That could be possible. ¬† However relaying on this speculation could be quite costly for potentially affected owners. ¬† After all, failure of the PR16 could spell serious injury or worse.

The fact is, these things are mass produced on an assembly line.  Efficiencies and cost usually dictate that the same internal parts are used in the same unit regardless of where it is going.  Brembo likely used the plastic part to save costs, since moulding plastic is far cheaper than using aluminum.

Unless there is a law within the country it is being shipped to which dictates that part must be of a certain quality or material design, manufacturing efficiencies dictate keeping the units identical.  So our more conservative guess is that its likely that all the PR16 MCs are made the same way.

So it is a global problem, why only a US recall right now?  Well, when it comes to recalls, how they are done depends on the country.  The US has a centralized National Highway Transportation Safety Authority (NHTSA) and they have a centralized their recall system, and that system works very quickly, and mandates that all manufacturers, distributors, and vendors of the part in question immediately address the issue.  In other words they have a strong legal mechanism to sort the issue out fast.

Other jurisdictions often don’t have that and rely on the manufacturer and distributors to make their own announcement about the product and deal with remedies as they see fit. ¬† So in Australia for example, owners would have to wait until the distributors for #Ducati #KTM #Aprilia and #Triumph to consult with the manufacturers in England, Austria, and Italy, and wait until they are given the word that a recall is in play. ¬†Then they would have to send word to the dealers or issue letters to affected owners to get the bikes in.

 

When you have different companies with different internal protocols at play, and a recall system is not centralized, then news may come at different times.

Further, until the distributors are officially told about a recall, they will simply say there isn’t one in play. ¬†Why? ¬†Well, they can’t speak for Brembo, or the manufacturer. ¬†They don’t have that authority. ¬†They are limited to passing on information from their upstream and not contradicting it.

Also… In the crazy world of litigation, if a company knows about an issue (for example an employee of a dealer or distributor) and admit to it, but don’t do anything about it and a loss is suffered (money, injury, death) then that company would be held liable, since they ‘knew’ of the issue and the courts may rule they had a duty to resolve it. ¬† So for this reason as well, the official word has to be kept. ¬†Even if there are murmurs behind closed doors in the mechanics bay.

In short, while we cannot be sure that the PR16 on worldwide bikes is at issue, we at Motorraddicts think that potentially affected owners should be wary of the problem and keep themselves updated.

So if your bike lands in this list, or you upgraded your MC, or your bike is equipped with the M50 Caliper, then keep an eye out, inquire with your dealers, and if you are really interested have a licensed mechanic open the MC up at your next service and see if the piston is made of plastic.

The USA recall (NHTSA Campaign Number: 17V812000) says that the following models are affected.  (This recall is yet to be updated with the Triumph or KTM data)

  • 2016 and 2017 Aprilia RSV4s fitted with Brembo brakes;
  • 2017 Aprilia Tuono 1100s fitted with Brembo brakes;
  • 2015-2018 Ducati 1299 STD / 1299 S / 1299 FE / 1299 SL produced from March 16, 2015 to September 22, 2017;
  • 2015-2018 Ducati Monster 1200 S / Monster 1200 R produced from March 04, 2015 to October 23, 2017;
  • 2015 Ducati Monster 1200R
  • 2015-2018 Ducati Multistrada S / Multistrada PP produced from March 16, 2015 to October 31, 2017;
  • 2015-2018 Ducati Panigale R produced from March 16, 2015 to June 20, 2017;
  • 2017-2018 Ducati Scrambler 800 Cafe Racer produced from March 01, 2017 to November 20, 2017;
  • 2015-2018 Ducati XDiavel S produced from January 12, 2016 to September 08, 2017.

For Aprilia Owners it seems that the Noale factory is indeed issuing a recall for their European bikes.   If you want to check if yours is affected, visit this link and enter your VIN number for confirmation.

http://static.piaggio.com/recall/form-aprilia_en.html

We will try and keep you updated on the issue as things progress.  Until then stay upright, and keep your throttle hand strong!

Cheers

Ronno РMotorraddicts.com #Like #Follow #Share

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